nudityandnerdery:

silensy:

2005-2014

Good lord, this is the most stark portrayal I’ve seen of this.

Holy crap, over nine years?

(Source: always-returning, via organicalchemist)

Timestamp: 1406781674

nudityandnerdery:

silensy:

2005-2014

Good lord, this is the most stark portrayal I’ve seen of this.

Holy crap, over nine years?

(Source: always-returning, via organicalchemist)

Why is it that old wives tales are called old wives tales

amazinglyamazingfabulousness:

When old men’s tales are called religion and philosophy?

(via feminist-revolution)

newyorker:

Emily Greenhouse asks: Why do news reports still count the numbers of women and children killed in war zones? http://nyr.kr/1xAjgSO

“If we truly wish to identify the most helpless victims, we should count, alongside children, the infirm and the elderly. Instead, we tally the number of women and children killed, reflecting and perpetuating outdated ideas about women’s lives and women’s bodies.”

Photograph by Ilia Yefimovich/Getty

Timestamp: 1406754455

newyorker:

Emily Greenhouse asks: Why do news reports still count the numbers of women and children killed in war zones? http://nyr.kr/1xAjgSO

“If we truly wish to identify the most helpless victims, we should count, alongside children, the infirm and the elderly. Instead, we tally the number of women and children killed, reflecting and perpetuating outdated ideas about women’s lives and women’s bodies.”

Photograph by Ilia Yefimovich/Getty

generalelectric:

Inspired by a young man, GE engineer Lyman Connor created an affordable bionic hand using only a 3D printer, his computer, and his technical skills. Watch his story here

Timestamp: 1406654859

generalelectric:

Inspired by a young man, GE engineer Lyman Connor created an affordable bionic hand using only a 3D printer, his computer, and his technical skills. Watch his story here

ucsdhealthsciences:

Liver Scarring Mechanism Identified In Mice

The human liver may be our most undervalued organ.

Not only does it have lizard-like regenerative powers, its eight connected lobes work round the clock to detoxify us of our vices – be they a slab of fatty steak or a flagon of beer.

When we aren’t being bad, and even when we are, the liver also helps us digest our food, store energy and vitamins (it can hold several years’ worth of B-12), and clear our blood of residues from taking medications. It even plays a role in maintaining our hormonal balance and keeping our bones strong.

It does all of this if that meaty three-pound organ under the right side of our ribcage is working properly. If the liver becomes diseased, many vital bodily processes can go awry.

Regardless of the type of assault or insult, the liver almost always shows signs of abuse by forming fibrous scar tissue, which can further impair the liver’s ability to function, with profound health consequences.

Reporting in the current issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have described a fundamental mechanism underlying the progression of cholestatic liver fibrosis, which is caused by the impairment of bile formation or bile flow not by lifestyle choices, like heavy drinking.

“Our study puts into perspective many previously contradictory studies, and provides a general approach to understanding the distinct mechanisms which lead to liver scaring and fibrosis,” said senior author Tatiana Kisseleva, MD, PhD and an assistant professor in the Department of Surgery. Fibrosis refers to progressive liver scarring, occurring in most types of chronic liver disease.

In the study, researchers identified a type of cell in the livers of mice (portal fibroblasts) that respond to bile-related liver injuries. When these cells become activated and proliferate, they secrete fibrous scar tissue.

Though the study was conducted in mice, preventing the activation of these cells in human livers could help prevent liver scarring in people with cholestatic liver disease.

Toward this effort, the scientists have now identified novel markers of activated portal fibroblasts that could be used to evaluate the source of liver injury in patients.

Timestamp: 1406576795

ucsdhealthsciences:

Liver Scarring Mechanism Identified In Mice

The human liver may be our most undervalued organ.

Not only does it have lizard-like regenerative powers, its eight connected lobes work round the clock to detoxify us of our vices – be they a slab of fatty steak or a flagon of beer.

When we aren’t being bad, and even when we are, the liver also helps us digest our food, store energy and vitamins (it can hold several years’ worth of B-12), and clear our blood of residues from taking medications. It even plays a role in maintaining our hormonal balance and keeping our bones strong.

It does all of this if that meaty three-pound organ under the right side of our ribcage is working properly. If the liver becomes diseased, many vital bodily processes can go awry.

Regardless of the type of assault or insult, the liver almost always shows signs of abuse by forming fibrous scar tissue, which can further impair the liver’s ability to function, with profound health consequences.

Reporting in the current issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have described a fundamental mechanism underlying the progression of cholestatic liver fibrosis, which is caused by the impairment of bile formation or bile flow not by lifestyle choices, like heavy drinking.

“Our study puts into perspective many previously contradictory studies, and provides a general approach to understanding the distinct mechanisms which lead to liver scaring and fibrosis,” said senior author Tatiana Kisseleva, MD, PhD and an assistant professor in the Department of Surgery. Fibrosis refers to progressive liver scarring, occurring in most types of chronic liver disease.

In the study, researchers identified a type of cell in the livers of mice (portal fibroblasts) that respond to bile-related liver injuries. When these cells become activated and proliferate, they secrete fibrous scar tissue.

Though the study was conducted in mice, preventing the activation of these cells in human livers could help prevent liver scarring in people with cholestatic liver disease.

Toward this effort, the scientists have now identified novel markers of activated portal fibroblasts that could be used to evaluate the source of liver injury in patients.

astudyinrose:

50 Shades of De-Grey-ding Women

(via engrprof)

asapscience:

kingconchobar:

I hate how controlling gravity is.  Like it tries to exert itself on everyone.

YEP

compoundchem:

Ever wondered how much water/caffeine/alcohol you’d need to drink to reach a lethal dose? This graphic shows the median lethal dose for all three!

Read more detail about LD50 tests in the accompanying post: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-ol

Timestamp: 1406486168

compoundchem:

Ever wondered how much water/caffeine/alcohol you’d need to drink to reach a lethal dose? This graphic shows the median lethal dose for all three!

Read more detail about LD50 tests in the accompanying post: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-ol

adamhrabovsky:

Trail of the Cedars, Glacier National Park - Adam Hrabovsky

(via s-c-i-guy)

Timestamp: 1406485969

adamhrabovsky:

Trail of the Cedars, Glacier National Park - Adam Hrabovsky

(via s-c-i-guy)

mindblowingscience:

Google wants to define a healthy human with its new baseline genetic study

Google’s got a big new project and it’s you. Well, not just you, but a genetic and molecular study of humanity that aims to grasp at what a healthy human should be. It’s in its early days, collecting anonymous data from 175 people, but it plans to expand to thousands later. The project is headed up by molecular biologist Andrew Conrad, who pioneered cheap HIV tests for blood-plasma donations. According to the WSJ, the team at Google X current numbers between 70 and 100, encompassing experts in physiology, biochemistry, optics, imaging and molecular biology.

The Baseline project will apparently take in hundreds of different samples, with Google using its information processing talents to expose biomarkers and other patterns - the optimistic result hopefully being faster ways of diagnosing diseases. Biomarkers has typically been used with late-stage diseases, as these studies have typically used already-sick patients. “He gets that this is not a software project that will be done in one or two years,” said Dr. Sam Gambhir, who is working with Dr. Conrad on the project. “We used to talk about curing cancer and doing this in a few years. We’ve learned to not say those things anymore.” Information from the project will remain anonymous: Google said that data won’t be shared with insurance companies, but the shadow of privacy issues hang over pretty much anything the company touches. Baseline started this summer, initially collecting fluids such as urine, blood, saliva and tears from the anonymous guinea pigs. Tissue samples will be taken later. “With any complex system, the notion has always been there to proactively address problems,” Dr. Conrad said. “That’s not revolutionary. We are just asking the question: If we really wanted to be proactive, what would we need to know? You need to know what the fixed, well-running thing should look like.”

(via shychemist)

Timestamp: 1406261028

mindblowingscience:

Google wants to define a healthy human with its new baseline genetic study

Google’s got a big new project and it’s you. Well, not just you, but a genetic and molecular study of humanity that aims to grasp at what a healthy human should be. It’s in its early days, collecting anonymous data from 175 people, but it plans to expand to thousands later. The project is headed up by molecular biologist Andrew Conrad, who pioneered cheap HIV tests for blood-plasma donations. According to the WSJ, the team at Google X current numbers between 70 and 100, encompassing experts in physiology, biochemistry, optics, imaging and molecular biology.

The Baseline project will apparently take in hundreds of different samples, with Google using its information processing talents to expose biomarkers and other patterns - the optimistic result hopefully being faster ways of diagnosing diseases. Biomarkers has typically been used with late-stage diseases, as these studies have typically used already-sick patients. “He gets that this is not a software project that will be done in one or two years,” said Dr. Sam Gambhir, who is working with Dr. Conrad on the project. “We used to talk about curing cancer and doing this in a few years. We’ve learned to not say those things anymore.” Information from the project will remain anonymous: Google said that data won’t be shared with insurance companies, but the shadow of privacy issues hang over pretty much anything the company touches. Baseline started this summer, initially collecting fluids such as urine, blood, saliva and tears from the anonymous guinea pigs. Tissue samples will be taken later. “With any complex system, the notion has always been there to proactively address problems,” Dr. Conrad said. “That’s not revolutionary. We are just asking the question: If we really wanted to be proactive, what would we need to know? You need to know what the fixed, well-running thing should look like.”

(via shychemist)

scienceyoucanlove:

These bananas were developed by researchers fromQueensland University of Technology (QUT), who are tackling vitamin A deficiency and malnutrition in the developing world. The biofortifed bananas are on track to be grown in Uganda by 2020: http://bit.ly/1pVhtqC

from Science Alert

Timestamp: 1406260840

scienceyoucanlove:

These bananas were developed by researchers fromQueensland University of Technology (QUT), who are tackling vitamin A deficiency and malnutrition in the developing world. The biofortifed bananas are on track to be grown in Uganda by 2020: http://bit.ly/1pVhtqC

from Science Alert

raptinawe:

The image traces the helical trajectory followed by the bodies of bacterial cells as they swim. Researchers have shown that the motion generates thrust. Before this, it was thought that the cell body contributes nothing to swimming in organisms that swim using flagella. Credit: Breuer Lab/Brown University

(via Bacteria swim with whole body, not just propellers)

(via betterknowamicrobe)

Timestamp: 1406140692

raptinawe:

The image traces the helical trajectory followed by the bodies of bacterial cells as they swim. Researchers have shown that the motion generates thrust. Before this, it was thought that the cell body contributes nothing to swimming in organisms that swim using flagella. Credit: Breuer Lab/Brown University

(via Bacteria swim with whole body, not just propellers)

(via betterknowamicrobe)